Wall Street Journal | The Postmodern President

President Obama spent his formative years in academia, so he’s no doubt familiar with postmodernism, the literary theory that rejects objective reality and insists instead that everything is a matter of interpretation and relative “truth.” At any rate he’s running the first postmodern Presidential campaign, now organized almost exclusively around allegations about his opponent that bear no relation to the observable universe.

The most important document of this new approach to politics may be this week’s now famous TV commercial in which a man on camera accuses Mitt Romney of killing his wife. (The man’s late wife, not Ann.) The spot features a Missouri steelworker called Joe Soptic, who recounts how Bain Capital bought his plant and eventually closed it, costing him his job and health benefits. “A short time after that,” he says, Ilyona Soptic was diagnosed with cancer. “I don’t know how long she was sick and I think maybe she didn’t say anything because she knew we couldn’t afford the insurance.”

He continues: “There was nothing they could do for her. And she passed away in 22 days. I do not think Mitt Romney realizes what he’s done to anyone, and furthermore I do not think Mitt Romney is concerned.”

It’s a sad tale, affectingly told. The production values are also excellent, courtesy of Priorities USA Action, Mr. Obama’s super PAC that ostensibly doesn’t coordinate with his campaign. But its notions about cause and effect are, well, novel.

 

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